In Paris, monkeypox vaccination gains steam with volunteer help

In Paris, monkeypox vaccination gains steam with volunteer help

PARIS — Doctor Kevin Huy was vaccinating people in Paris against Covid-19 when he answered a call for volunteers to inoculate against a more recent global outbreak — monkeypox.

Now he is putting jabs in arms at Checkpoint Paris, a sexual health center in the heart of the French capital dedicated to LGBT people.

PARIS — Doctor Kevin Huy was vaccinating people in Paris against Covid-19 when he answered a call for volunteers to inoculate against a more recent global outbreak — monkeypox.

Now he is putting jabs in arms at Checkpoint Paris, a sexual health center in the heart of the French capital dedicated to LGBT people.

While admitting that early logistical problems may have delayed the initial rollout, Verdier emphasized that there was now no problem in acquiring doses.

The issue has become finding people to put jabs in arms.

“Health professionals have been very hard hit by the Covid crisis,” she said.

Last week the French government said it would mobilise more people to help with vaccinations, including health students.

A lack of staff has meant Checkpoint Paris has not been able to meet the demand for monkeypox inoculations.

“We were able to bring in temporary doctors but it is more difficult to recruit nurses,” said the centre’s head, Sebastien Denglos.

Huy, a GP from the northern suburbs of Paris, was one of those doctors.

“I was already vaccinating against Covid in the 20th district of Paris, when I saw in a WhatsApp group that more people were needed for monkeypox,” he said.

The help was welcomed at the centre, which also fears it will struggle to administer the necessary second dose in time due to staffing shortages.

However French health authorities have indicated that the 28-day time limit between the first and second doses may be extended.

Another timeline is almost up — the great August evacuation from Paris for summer holidays.

Arnaud, 22, went to Checkpoint Paris on Thursday to make an appointment for a jab the following day.

“I didn’t want to stay isolated at home and spoil the little holiday I have,” he said.

Once he is vaccinated, he hopes “to be able to spend a summer in relative peace”.

The WHO has emphasised that vaccination will not give instant protection against monkeypox infection. That can take weeks.

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