Ukraine Live Updates: War’s Effects Widen as Russia Vows More Reprisals

The Kremlin halted natural gas shipments to Poland and Bulgaria in its toughest response yet to European sanctions. Explosions inside Russia near the Ukraine border raised fears that the war might spread.

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Sehii Schevchuuk, right, and some of the dogs he cares for that have been abandoned near the apartment building where he lives in Horenka, near Kyiv, Ukraine.
Sehii Schevchuuk, right, and some of the dogs he cares for that have been abandoned near the apartment building where he lives in Horenka, near Kyiv, Ukraine.Credit…David Guttenfelder for The New York Times

Here’s the latest on the war in Ukraine.

A gas processing station in Chiren, Bulgaria. Russia’s state-run gas company, Gazprom, announced that it was suspending natural gas shipments to Poland and Bulgaria on Wednesday.
A gas processing station in Chiren, Bulgaria. Russia’s state-run gas company, Gazprom, announced that it was suspending natural gas shipments to Poland and Bulgaria on Wednesday.Credit…Bta Lubomira Filipova/Associated Press

Fears are mounting that the war in Ukraine will spill across its borders.

Families arriving in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, last week after fleeing Mariupol, which is under siege by Russian forces.
Families arriving in Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine, last week after fleeing Mariupol, which is under siege by Russian forces.Credit…Lynsey Addario for The New York Times

In a warehouse bomb shelter, children perform a wartime play about family separation.

In a warehouse-turned-bomb-shelter in Lviv, in western Ukraine, a group of children performed a play featuring a range of stories about family separation as told from the perspective of children. The play, “Mama Po Skaipu,” or “Mother via Skype,” is based on stories by nearly a dozen Ukrainian writers, and it was a rare cultural event in a city now under regular air-raid alerts.

The House passes a mostly symbolic bill urging Biden to sell seized Russian yachts to fund more Ukraine aid.

F.B.I. agents and members of Spain’s Civil Guard searched and seized a yacht said to be owned by the Russian oligarch Viktor F. Vekselberg in April.
F.B.I. agents and members of Spain’s Civil Guard searched and seized a yacht said to be owned by the Russian oligarch Viktor F. Vekselberg in April.Credit…Francisco Ubilla/Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The House on Wednesday overwhelmingly passed a mostly symbolic bill urging President Biden to sell the frozen luxury assets of Russian oligarchs hit with sanctions and use the funds to provide additional military and humanitarian aid to Ukraine.

The legislation is nonbinding, but its 417-to-8 passage reflected a bipartisan desire on Capitol Hill for the president to take a more aggressive posture as the United States and European allies grapple with what to do with Russian assets seized in response to Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine.

The U.N. Security Council is holding an informal meeting on justice and accountability for crimes committed in Ukraine. Karim Khan, the chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, said that 43 countries had referred the situation in Ukraine to the I.C.C., which had for the first time joined a joint effort — with Ukraine, Poland and Lithuania — to investigate war crimes.“This is a singular moment, it is a critical juncture,” Khan said. “The implications are profound in Ukraine, but they extent beyond Ukraine. It is time to cling to the law.”Lynsey Addario4 hours ago

Lynsey AddarioReporting from Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine

Anna Shostak, 7, waits for her family at a reception tent in Zaporizhzhia, in southeastern Ukraine. While trying to flee the Russian-occupied city of Berdiansk, Anna’s family was turned back five times at Russian checkpoints or offered the option to travel to Crimea before they successfully escaped.

Credit…Lynsey Addario for The New York Times

5 hours ago

David E. Sanger and Kate Conger

Russia is using cyberattacks in Ukraine to support military strikes, a report found.

A power plant in Vinnytsia, Ukraine, last month. Cyber attacks from Russian agencies have been targeting various parts of Ukraine’s infrastructure.
A power plant in Vinnytsia, Ukraine, last month. Cyber attacks from Russian agencies have been targeting various parts of Ukraine’s infrastructure.Credit…Rodrigo Abd/Associated Press

For weeks after the outbreak of the war in Ukraine, American officials wondered about the weapon that seemed to be missing: Russia’s mighty cyberarsenal, which most experts expected would be used in the opening hours of an invasion to bring down Ukraine’s power grid, fry its cellphone system and cut off President Volodymyr Zelensky from the world.

None of that happened. But in a new study released Wednesday by Microsoft, it is now clear that Russia used its A-team of hackers to conduct hundreds of far more subtle attacks, many timed to coincide with incoming missile or ground attacks. And it turned out that, just as in the ground war, the Russians were less skillful, and the Ukrainians were better defenders, than most experts expected.

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